RTÉ is systematically excluding pro-life voices from the airwaves
The State, backed up by the national broadcaster, is now trying to throttle the life out of the pro-life movement, writes David Quinn   RTÉ has evidently decided that abortion is a settled issue. The matter was decided in favour of abortion by a two-to-one margin last May, and those who run the show at…
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Using our talents well: a time for both pastors and prophets
Despite setbacks at the ballot box, the Church must not lose its nerve, writes David Quinn   Back in the 1990s, Ruairi Quinn, then Finance Minister, declared Ireland was now ‘post-Catholic’. He said it in the aftermath of the 1995 divorce referendum. He knew that many people still went to Mass. What he meant was…
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A social suppression of the Faith
It’s harder than ever to speak out against unfair criticism of the Church, writes David Quinn   A few days before Christmas I posted a Tweet which pointed out that I often come across people these days who find it hard to be open about their Catholic faith both in the workplace and even sometimes in…
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2018? Annus horribilis
This was a terrible year for Ireland, writes David Quinn   The year just gone will go down as one of the worst, morally speaking, since Ireland gained independence in 1922. May 25 – the date of the abortion referendum – will eventually be remembered as the day when a two-to-one majority of the Irish…
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Patience: a divine virtue
Faith means taking the long view, writes David Quinn   When you read the Bible it is easy to miss important ideas when you are not concentrating. How many times have I read, or listened to someone else reading, the opening chapter of St Luke’s Gospel where the Angel declares to Zechariah that his wife,…
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Made in the image of God
Human rights need Christian foundations, writes David Quinn   This month marks the 70th anniversary of the passage of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the key human rights document of our time. This document is quoted across the political spectrum to this day. It is used and misused to advance various human…
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Tales that are as old as time
Today’s PC versions of fairy tales may date very quickly, writes David Quinn   It’s Christmas and so that means its panto season. Thousands of parents up and down the country will bring their children to a version of timeless, classical fairy tales like Snow White at the Tivoli Theatre. But wait, are they timeless…
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The Stone Age meets the Modern Age
There must be a right to share the Good News in a peaceful way, writes David Quinn   Let’s suppose for the sake of the argument that somewhere in deepest, darkest Ireland explorers stumbled across an undiscovered tribe of Irish people still living in the Stone Age. The question would immediately arise, what should we…
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Silent passengers on a European train
Christians are free to disagree about the EU, writes David Quinn   Ireland is rather smug just now about the whole Brexit situation. We believe that Britain has landed itself in a big mess (and it has) and we seem to be thoroughly enjoying its discomfort. I’m not sure we should be though, and there…
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The empty trenches of Ireland’s public memory
Our shifting views towards World War I 
show how fickle we can be, writes David Quinn   It is now commonplace for Irish pupils to learn the famous poem by World War I poet, Wilfred Owen, ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’. Owen was killed on the Western Front in 1917. Owen’s poem mocks the idea that…
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