Category: Reviews

The ‘fallen nature’ of humanity

Homo Lapsus: Sin Evolution and the God who is Love by Niamh Middleton(Deep River Books, $US14.99; available through Amazon UK, £11.53)   Fr 
Joseph 
McCann
 CM   Darwin’s evolution poses the most powerful challenge to belief in God and Creation and Salvation.  Evolution explains human existence as a scientifically determined process, so there is no…

Echoes of a great European nation in Ireland

The Polish Society Yearbook 2018 Jaroslaw Plachecki (Polish Society, email: ips.dublin@gmail.com; post only, Polish House, 20 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2, Ireland)   The Irish Polish Society was established in Dublin in January 1979. The members were largely Poles who migrated from their country following World War II. The Society acquired its Centre – ‘Polish House’…

NCH resounds to a joyous celebration for Veronica McSwiney

Earlier this month the National Concert Hall was the venue for a significant celebration – the 80th birthday of treasured pianist Veronica McSwiney. The occasion, promoted by Dublin International Piano Competition, found her in spectacular form, playing with her usual aplomb and communicating with her audience through the mastery of her musicianship. The evening was…

The history of the Church of Ireland continues

Irish Anglicanism 1969-2019: Essays to mark the 150th Anniversary of the Disestablishment of the Church of Ireland edited by Kenneth Milne & Paul Harron(Four Courts Press,  €24.95) Robert
 Marshall In 1970, to mark the centenary of its disestablishment, a volume of essays edited by Fr Michael Hurley SJ was generously presented by 17 ecumenical essayists…

Sad tale of how charisma choked truth

We’ve always had to put up with extremism and while it is fuelled nowadays by social media, it is not dependent on modern technology. Religious extremism is the worst of all, mimicking something that should be about love and dignity. The phenomenon is particularly evident in cults and in cultish behaviour sometimes found in mainstream…

The smouldering issue at the heart of Northern politics

Burned: The inside story of the ‘cash for ash’ scandal and Northern Ireland’s secretive new elite by Sam McBride (Merrion Press, €19.95)   The scandal of Northern Ireland’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is one of bureaucratic failure, sloppy political oversight, and culpable procrastination, all leading to a colossal waste of public money. This book will…

Reports of God’s death much exaggerated

Has Science Killed God? Faraday Papers on Science and Religion edited by Denis Alexander (SPCK, £19.99)   Christopher
 Moriarty   This is a truly amazing book. Written by a team of eminent scientists, who are also believers in the reality of the spiritual, it provides a great deal of comfort to people of faith who…

Bad news continues to drive the agenda

As we ease into the early days of 2020, with threats of global conflict and environmental disaster prominent in news and current affairs coverage so far, anything that gives us well-grounded hope is welcome. But good news doesn’t tend to get much prominence. The dilemmas and paradoxes surrounding these issues were aired in a leisurely…

Little Women leads the way into a bright new decade

Cinemas usually experience the celluloid equivalent of haemophilia at this time of year, either due to ritualistic hibernation, post-festive lethargy and/or the sedentary hangover of a Yuletide addiction to television. To draw patrons away from the sofas to which they seem to become almost surgically attached over the 12 days of Christmas – if not…